THE BO DISTRICT COUNCIL CHAIRMAN CLARIFIES THE ROLES AND FRUNCTIONS OF THE BO DISTRICT OFFICE; TO ENSURE HIS STAFF DO NOT MISUNDERSTAND THE DIFFERENCES!!

 


A. District Officers as the Principal Representatives of the Central Government in the District

 

As the principal representatives of the Central Government in the District that command authority, and are held in high esteem by the community, including other Public Servants, Paramount Chiefs and other Local Authorities, District Officers are regarded as the principal authority of the Central Government in the District and they:

 

1.       Disseminate government policies in the District and ensure/ facilitate their implementation;

2.       Coordinate central government activities in the District, particularly MDAs’ non-devolved functions, and facilitate devolution of specified functions to the Local Councils;

3.       Monitor the activities of Local Councils and Ministries/Departments and Agencies in the District;

4.       Play host to visiting VIPs e.g. His Excellency the President, the Honourable Vice President, Ministers, etc.;

5.       Conduct administrative investigations on behalf of Government relating to allegations of gross misconduct of Paramount Chiefs, sub-chiefs and/or other serious matters that are inimical to good governance.

B.      District Officers and National Security

 

District Officers and the Police are collectively responsible for the security and maintenance of law and order in the District. As chief custodian of security and intelligence in the District, District Officers serve as Chairmen of the District Intelligence Committees. In this regard, they are expected to:

 

1.       Maintain good relations with local authorities, civil society, security services etc. to promote peace and tranquillity in the District;

2.       Serve as Chairmen of the District Watch Committee;

3.      Serve as Chairmen of the District Security Committee (DISEC). The Senior District Officer (SDO) in the Provincial District is a member of the Provincial Security Committee;

4.       Provide timely information to Government (through the Minister responsible for Local Government and/or the President) on matters or persons which threaten peace and stability of the area.

C.      District Officers as Superintendents of Chiefdom Administrations

 

Chiefdom Administration is a vital adjunct to the Central Administration of the country. The duties of Chiefdom Administration Authorities are to ensure good administration and maintenance of law and order at the grassroots level. The broad guidelines for the execution of these duties are provided in the relevant sections of our Laws.
The responsibility of District Officers is therefore to ensure that the laws are respected particularly with regard to the use of Government funds, properties and the safeguard of justice. District Officers are also required to supervise Chiefdom Administrations and ensure that abuse of authority is minimized in the administration of the Chiefdoms in the interest of good governance.
District Officers are the guarantors of peace and security in the chiefdom. In addition, District Officers should encourage Chiefdom Authorities to run their localities in a way that would enhance the living standards of their people. Given the conservative nature of these communities, District Officers should respect their customs and traditions.
In their interaction with Chiefdom Administration Authorities, District Officers:

5.       Serve as a vital link between the Central Government, Local Councils and Chiefdom Administrations;

6.       Ensure good governance practices in the chiefdoms;

7.       Ensure that local authorities do not abuse their authority or carry out gross miscarriage of justice in the day-to-day administration of their chiefdoms;

8.       Address complaints and petitions from Paramount Chiefs and their subjects in a timely manner;

9.       Mediate in disputes between Paramount Chiefs and their people;

10.    Receive and address complaints expeditiously from aggrieved persons in the community;

11.    On the basis of intelligence take pre-emptive action to forestall conflicts in the locality;

12.    Conduct the revision of Chiefdom Councilors’ Lists;

13.    Conduct the election of Section and Town Chiefs;

14.    Assist the Provincial Secretary (who is the Declaration Officer) in the election of Paramount Chiefs;

15.    Mediate or settle disputes between Chiefdom Authorities, Local Councils and MDAs;

16.    Ensure proper assessment and collection of Local Tax and the payment of annual rebates to Town and Section Chiefs;

17.    Address boundary, bush and secret society disputes.

 

D.    District Officers and Paramount Chiefs

Paramount Chiefs should at all times regard the District Officers as the principal administrators of the Districts. Disputes between Paramount Chiefs and their sub-chiefs are resolved by the District Officer. The relationship between District Officers and Paramount Chiefs should be characterized by mutual respect and understanding. All matters pertaining to the administration of Chiefdoms should be channelled through District Officers and on no account should Paramount Chiefs bye-pass District Officers. In specific matters like absence from the Chiefdom, holding of sub-chief elections, addressing bush/boundary disputes, secret society issues etc., the prior consultation and/or approval of the District Officers should be sought. Paramount Chiefs should at all times co-operate with District Officers by responding to official calls and carrying out lawful directives emanating from them. On no account should sub-chiefs who have been duly elected and recognised by Government and whose elections have been accordingly Gazetted, be suspended from office or relieved of their responsibilities by Paramount Chiefs without the prior approval of Government. District Officers as representatives of the Central Government will take appropriate action on representations made to them on matters of this nature.

 

E.       District Officers and the Police

District Officers and the Police are collectively responsible for the maintenance of security and law and order in the district. Collaboration between these two key Government functionaries in the District is absolutely essential. Should any occasion arise for the arrest of a Provincial Secretary or District Officer outside of the authority the Anti-Corruption Commission, the Inspector-General of Police should be consulted who will in turn obtain the fiat of the Secretary to the Cabinet and Head of the Civil Service and the Attorney-General and Minister of Justice. If the fiat is obtained for the arrest of a District Officer, such arrest, as far as possible, should be executed outside his area of jurisdiction. Similarly, a Paramount Chief can be arrested only subject to the fiat of the Minister responsible for Local Government and the Attorney-General and Minister of Justice.

F.     Public Meetings and other Local Council Activities in the District

It is advisable that all official or public meetings and other major public activities within the District are organized with the prior information of the District Officer. This is merely to ensure that, as chief custodian of security/intelligence in the District, the District Officer is able to take necessary measures in case of emergency.

G.    Political Co-operation

In order to ensure the smooth running of the District, co-operation between District Officers and all authorities in the District is a necessary requirement. In this respect, it is important for all residents in the District to accord District Officers the respect that befits their position.

H.      District Officers and Provincial Secretaries

It should be noted that the Provincial Secretaries are the Chief Administrative Officers in their respective Regions/Provinces which comprise a number of Districts and Chiefdoms. Itineraries of the movement of District Officers should be submitted to their Provincial Secretaries at regular intervals. Any changes should be communicated in time. Whenever District Officers have cause to leave their Districts, they must do so with the prior knowledge of their Provincial Secretaries. Before leaving their station, District Officers should delegate their responsibilities to their next in command.

I.       District Officers and their Subordinates

 The rule governing the relationship between District Officers and their Assistants is spelt out in Cap. 60(3) as amended as follows:- “Any Assistant District Officer of a District may perform any of the duties of the District Officer of that district, but shall only discharge such portion thereof as may, from time to time, be assigned to him by the District Officer, subject to any special instructions from the Provincial Secretary, and while performing any of the said duties he shall have the same power as the District Officer”. To ensure the smooth administration of the Districts, it is necessary for District Officers and their Assistants to have a good working relationship. There should exist mutual respect and understanding between them. The Assistant District Officer should at all times accept the District Officer as his superior officer and should carry out all legitimate instructions and duties assigned to him. Correspondence between District Officers and their Assistants should be polite in tone even where, for one reason or another, emotions have been aroused. In the case of conflict between District Officers and their Assistants, the respective Provincial Secretaries should intervene for the purpose of conflict resolution. The Civil Service Code, Rules and Regulations relating to discipline etc., are supposed to be known by subordinate officers and should understand that they cannot explain away their irregular conduct and performance simply on grounds of ignorance.

J.        District Officers and Heads of Sectoral Ministries (Departments), Agencies and Local Councils

The progress of any administrative unit in a modern setting cannot be accomplished by the actions of only one set of Government agents however predominant their role. In the context of Sierra Leone, the situation has considerably changed from the days when District Officers, in addition to being responsible for the maintenance of law and order and the collection of taxes in the Districts, also served as the operational arm of other departments. The pace of economic development, particularly after independence, and the complexities of the facets of that development have been accompanied by an increasing need for specialist attention to some of the areas that were once looked after by District Officers. Hence, today, the variety of government agencies in the districts include departments such as Lands, Country Planning and the Environment, Labour, Social Security and Employment, Agriculture, Forestry and Food Security, Mineral Resources, Social Welfare, Gender and Children’s Affairs, Health and Sanitation, and Energy and Water Resources. The purpose of this approach is to ensure that the use of resources allocated for the development of any section within the district is maximized and the targets achieved with the best of skills. In the same vein, Government has adopted a policy of decentralization by which certain functions of the Central Government have been passed by law to Local Councils to facilitate and enhance the delivery of services to the communities. District Officers will thus be required to facilitate the activities of the Local Councils by creating the necessary enabling environment for them to discharge their duties. The record of this approach indicates that competition, rivalries and jealousies over administrative preserves have often resulted in uneasiness in the relationships between the various heads of department in the Districts. In this situation, the role of the District Officer must be limited to that of a general “keeper of the house” whose primary function is to ensure that tranquility prevails in the District to allow other government agents to carry out their various duties. His function is also that of an authoritative “drawer of attention” of Government to anything that may be going wrong with the running of those Departments, Agencies and Local Councils, since the monitoring of their activities is also part of the functions of District Officers. In the light of the foregoing, mutual respect and understanding and spirit of co-operation should govern the relationships between District Officers and Heads of Departments, Agencies and Local Councils. However, for this co-operation to be effective, it is desirable for Heads of Departments, Agencies and Local Councils, to adequately brief District Officers on the activities of their Departments through monthly meetings of District Co-ordinating Committees comprising all Heads of Departments, Agencies and Local Councils in the Districts and chaired by District Officers, minutes of which should be forwarded to the Provincial Secretary, the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Local Government, the Secretary to the President, the Secretary to the Cabinet and Head of the Civil Service and the relevant ministries. This is in the interest of all concerned. Also, Heads of Departments, Agencies and Local Councils should recognize the general overall responsibility assigned to District Officers for the running of the Districts. District Officers, on the other hand, should be aware that Heads of Departments, Agencies and Local Councils within their Districts are the authorized agents of the sectoral Ministries and should therefore be allowed to execute their duties without undue interference.

K.    District Officers and the Administration of Estates in the Provinces

District Officers are responsible for the administration of estates of persons who die intestate, in collaboration with the Paramount Chiefs.

 

District Officers and the Press

 

While it is generally acknowledged that modern day governance requires public servants to ensure transparency and accountability in the conduct of public affairs, given their strategic positions, in dealing with the Press, District Officers should be circumspect and guarded. Any adverse publication made against them or about their Districts should be brought to their attention. District Officers should immediately submit their comments on the publication to their Provincial Secretaries copying the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Local Government. The latter should advise the Secretary to the Cabinet and Head of the Civil Service on a suitable line of action, if deemed necessary, after having received the comments of the Provincial Secretary concerned. If a prima facie case is established that the press report is malicious or defamatory or frivolous and misleading, the matter should be referred to the Ministry of Information and Communications for appropriate action. Local Police intervention to interrogate District Officers on the grounds of any press report or any other report whether oral or written reflecting adversely on their conduct must be authorized by the Provincial Secretary or the Inspector-General of Police after consultation with the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Local Government. Such interrogation should take place in the District Officer’s office. The interpretation of District Officer includes “Assistant District Officer”. General District Officers like all other civil servants should be impartial in the discharge of their duties and must at all times serve the Government of the day and be politically neutral. District Officers are also required to observe the following ethical standards in their dealings with the public:

·         Carry out his duties in a way that maintains public confidence in the integrity of his office;

·         Treat the public and fellow public officers with courtesy and respect;

·         Respond to the public with fairness, promptness and respect;

·         Maintain an appropriate standard of dress and personal hygiene;

·         Always work within the law.

 

 

 


THE BO DISTRICT COUNCIL

The Local Government Act 2004 makes provisions for political, fiscal and administrative decentralization. The Bo District Council is designated the highest political authority in the Bo District, and elections to these are held  every five years; since   2004.

The formal articulation of the government’s Decentralization Policy, published in September 2010 and launched in February 2011, states that local councils are the ‘highest development and service delivery authorities’ in their localities.

In terms of revenue generation, local councils generate their own funds through loans and grants, as well as from taxes, mining revenues, royalties and licenses, but typically at least 70% of revenue is obtained from central government transfers.

These funds are tied to specific sector-based activities and programmes, and Parliament reserves the right to add conditions to how local council transfers are spent.

In conjunction with sector-based spending, the Act has seen the administrative functions of 17 ministries, departments and agencies devolved to local level.

Central institutions are still responsible for strategy, monitoring and evaluation, procurement and recruitment.

Bo District Council has had a number of successes, such as providing the opportunity for citizens to participate and stand in local elections, access information on government activities and hold the government accountable.

In terms of concrete service delivery, despite a number of challenges, Bo District local government council is considered by the constituents served,  to have had a significant impact on service delivery

Councillors  are elected through universal suffrage and represent  wards within the Bo  District: three to a ward in municipal councils and one in  district councils. 




The Bo District Councils is headed by Mr Joseph Munda Bindi  as its Chairman. The Bo District Councils also  include three paramount chiefs. The council promotes development and  welfare services, mobilise resources by setting tax rates  and implementing budgeted spending. 

The Council also  make and enforce by-laws – for instance on taxation, the  use of streams and rivers, domestic violence and cultural  practices. These are always consistent with the constitution  and the Local Government Act, and must be approved  by the Attorney-General. 

Councillors are responsible for maintaining close contact with wards and chiefdoms,  consulting on key issues, communicating council  decisions and promoting development activities. All Bo District Councillors reside in their local communities, so  citizens can engage decision-makers more easily. 

Ward Development Committees (WDCs) comprise  every Councillor in the ward, the paramount chief, and  not more than 10 other persons, at least five of whom  must be women. Ward representatives are elected.

 Since the re-establishment of local councils in 2004, the traditional authorities, known as Chiefdom Administrations, have operated side by side with the formal local government structures. The important role of Chiefdoms was reconfirmed by the adoption of the Chieftaincy Act of 2009. The Chieftaincy Act of 2009 institutionalized the power of traditional authorities, acquired during the colonial era, and “… froze the institution in the form it had existed at the end of the colonial period”

The adoption of this Act was a deliberate attempt to re-legitimize the institutions of traditional authorities, as their popularity and legitimacy had been greatly weakened during the civil war.

When elected local councils were reinstated in 2004 after a hiatus of more than 30 years, they joined a complex system of already existing local authority structures that draw their organization and legitimacy from a wide range of different systems and traditions— customary, colonial, and modern.

 

BO DISTRICT COUNCIL SUPPORTS DELIVERY OF AGRICULTURE EXTENSION SERVICES

In synergy with the “National Sustainable Agriculture Development Plan 2010-2030;  the Bo District Council provides financial, material and technical manpower support to the Bo District base office of the Ministry of Agriculture Forestry and Food Security (MAFFS), to be able to effectively facilitate the implementation of climate sensitive agricultural extension services in Bo District communities.  

The focus of support for the immediate past years had been:

·       Sustainable land and water management system

·       Rural infrastructure and trade related capacities building for improved access to market

·       Improved food production to reduce hunger including emergencies and disasters that require agricultural support

·       Agricultural technology development, dissemination and adoption

·       Climate Sensitive and Sustainable use of forestry, fisheries and livestock resources

·       Cross-cutting issues; including agricultural policy formulation and review, agricultural statistics, M&E, women in agriculture,    

        youth in agriculture and farmer health

THE DECENTRALIZATION POLICY OF SIERRA LEONE

FOR THE PURPOSE TO:

•       promote transparency, accountability, inclusion and prudent public financial management;

•       reduce conflict by opening up space for political participation (Governance and Development at the door steps of the Local People);

•       improve democratic accountability of the state to citizens and restore citizens’ trust in government; and

•       reverse the economic downturn and bring about improved service delivery.

 

BO DISTRICT COUNCIL AND MSWGCA IN SIERRA LEONE.


  • Assess, evaluate and address the welfare situation generally in the country in so far as it affects vulnerable groups.
  • Register, trace, reunify and reintegrate unaccompanied children and children associated with the fighting forces with their families and communities:
  • The reintegration of children associated with the war has officially ended, although there is still a lapse in the exercise that is causing problems now and again.
  • Ensure the rights of children in accordance with Government’s current policies based on the United Nations Convention on the Rights (CRC) and the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (ACRWC).
  • Assist and reconcile feuding families and with special reference to the protection and welfare of their children.
  • Monitor and coordinate the activities of all voluntary/community-based organizations and non-governmental organizations in this sector for effective welfare services to the people.
  • Promote consensus on the conceptual framework that guides the identification of gender disparity in society and analyze the causes, on the basis of current national policy on gender mainstreaming.
  • Raise awareness and recognition of gender disparity in all sectors of society using electronics and print media, as well as interpersonal communication channels.
  • Train development planners and policy makers to use gender analysis tools to develop and orientate pictorial projects, programs and policies in the public sectors.
  • Establish a resource base for the collection, analysis and dissemination of information and statistical data on Gender specific indicators for various ages and socio-economic categories, with a view to impact on policy formulation and programming in related Ministries.
  • Advocate for the allocation of adequate technical, financial and organizational resources within the line Ministries in order to re-orientate human development policies and programs of managers, educators, health workers other and decision makers, in so far as they affect the closing of the Gender gap.
  • Mobilize additional resources, through UN Agencies, Embassies and Foreign Government establishments, like the British Council and the Commonwealth Secretariat, NGOs, the private sector and other civic groups to support programs on Gender, Women, Children, the Disabled and the Aged.
  • Advocate for the integration of women into the development process at all levels through programs and policies.
  • Work closely in collaboration with all Government Ministries and Establishments and with all national advocacy and welfare groups like the Women’s Forum, the Network of Women Ministers and Parliamentarians, the 50/50 group, Sierra Leone Union of Disability Issues (SLUDI), Friendship Society of the Elderly and the Retired and the Forum for African Women Educationalists (FAWE).

  • PREAMBLE TO APEM_SL_LTD



    We the members of the APEM SL, LTD are conscious of the absolute need for development, unity and progress in Sierra Leone.

     

    Being cognizant of the fact that social and economic development at community level can be best achieved through organized community work.

     

    With strong faith in our preparedness to facilitate the rehabilitation of the social and economic infrastructure of the displaced population in Sierra Leone.

     

    Whereas we seek to carry forward our intention through co-operation with other organizations or individuals while remaining committed to harnessing available resources for the promotion of a vibrant and self reliant economy in Sierra Leone.

     

    Determined to organize ourselves into a nationaL Non Governmental Organization of our APEM SL, LTD ; based in Bo City, in keeping with the spirit herein declared, we hereby endorse this document as the principal legal instrument that will guide and determine our existence and operation in Sierra Leone and which shall be herein after referred to as the APEM SL, LTD Constitution.

    CODES OF CONDUCT FOR MEMBER ORGANISATIONS

    CODES OF CONDUCT FOR MEMBER ORGANISATIONS

    1.    Members shall not engage in activities that harm their

    organizations, clients or profession.

     

    2.    Members shall not engage in activities that conflict with their fiduciary, ethical and legal obligations to their organizations, clients or profession.

     

    3.    Members shall effectively disclose all potential and actual conflicts of interest; such disclosure does not preclude or imply ethical impropriety.

     

    4.    Members shall comply with all applicable local, state, provincial civil and criminal laws of Sierra Leone.

     

    5.    Members must recognize their individual boundaries of competence and are forthcoming and truthful about their professional experience and qualifications and will represent their achievements accurately and without exaggeration.

     

    6.    Members shall refrain from knowingly infringing the intellectual property rights of other parties at all times. Members shall address and rectify any inadvertent infringement that may occur.

     

    7.    Members shall protect the confidentiality of all privileged information relating to the provider/client relationships.

     

    8.    Members shall take care to ensure that all solicitation and communication materials are accurate and correctly reflect their organizations’ mission and use of solicited funds.

     

    9.    Members shall take care to ensure that donors receive informed, accurate  and ethical advice about the value and tax implications of contributions.

     

    11.   Members shall take care to ensure that funds and other forms of support requested from APEM are used for the purpose(s) stated.

     

    12.   Members shall take care to ensure proper stewardship of all revenue sources, including timely reports on the use and management of such funds from APEM.

     

    13.   Members shall obtain explicit consent by APEM before altering the conditions of financial transactions.

     

    14.   Members shall not disclose privileged or confidential information to unauthorized parties.

     

    15.   Members shall give donors and clients the opportunity to have their names removed from lists that are sold to, rented to or exchanged with other organizations.

     

    16.    Members shall not accept or give bribes in any shape or form. Members may however accept performance-based compensations, such as bonuses, provided such bonuses are in accord with prevailing practices within the members’ own organizations.

     

    17.    Any member receiving funds from APEM must meet the legal requirements for the disbursement of those funds.


    APEM SL LTD CBO MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION FORM

    AGENCY FOR PEOPLES EMPOWERMENT  SIERRA LEONE, LIMITED, (APEM SL LTD)

     
    ORGANIZATIONAL MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION FORM

     

    Name of Community Organisation

     

    Name of main contact person

     

    Job title of Contact Person

     

    Address for correspondence,

     

    CBO Contact Email

     

                                    CBO Contact  Phone

     

     

     

     




     

     

    Application Endorsed and Signed by :

    Full Names:

     

    Signature                                                                                   Date              


    Gender Audit Strategy for APEM SL LTD

     

    Gender Audit Strategy for APEM



     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    APEM, BO.

    September, 2005

     

     A GENDER AUDIT STRATEGY AT APEM

     

    The following APEM Gender Audit Questionnaire will be used by APEM administrative, programme and field staffs to assess the gender sensitivity of the organisation.

     

    I.             Programming

     

    A.            Programme Planning and Design

     

    ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, TO WHAT EXTENT:

     

    1. Is the integration of gender equity in programs/projects practised on the APEM?
    2. Are gender equity goals and objectives included in programme/project design?
    3. For each programme/project, is there a needs assessment, including an analysis of gender roles and responsibilities in the targeted community?
    4. Are best practices in gender integration in programming incorporated in subsequent programme/project design?
    5. Are gender questions or criteria included in your programme/project proposal approval process?
    6. Does your organisation use participatory methods to incorporate the views and preferences of both men and women community members in project design?

     

     

    B.            Programme Implementation

     

    ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, TO WHAT EXTENT:

     

    1. Does the implementation plan for programmes/projects include activities that strengthen skills and provide women with equal access to services and training?
    2. Does the implementation plan for programmes/projects include activities that strengthen skills and provide men with equal access to services and training?
    3. Does your project implementation strategies and plans take into account existing gender roles and interests of both men and women participants?
    4. Do Women service receivers of my organisation’s programmes/projects value and see our programmes/projects as beneficial to their lives.?
    5. Do Men service receivers of my organisation’s programmes/projects value and see our programmes/projects as beneficial to their lives.?
    6. Does My organisation  develop the capacity to recognise and handle resistance to addressing gender issues in our programmes/projects.?

     

     

     C.            Technical Expertise

     

    ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 , TO WHAT EXTENT:

     

    1. Is there a person or division responsible for gender in your organisation?
    2. Is there assigned staff responsibility for gender integration in different departments?
    3. Do staff have the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes to carry out their work with gender awareness?
    4. Does your organisation consistently draw upon a person or division within the organisation who is responsible for gender programming?
    5. Is there training of project and program staff in gender planning and analysis?
    6. Are Program/project planning, monitoring, evaluation and advisory teams in my organisation consist of members who are gender-sensitive and include at least one person with specific expertise and skills on gender issues?

     

    D.            Monitoring and Evaluation

     

    ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 , TO WHAT EXTENT:

     

    1. Is gender disaggregated data collected for projects and programmes?
    2. Is the gender impact of projects and programmes monitored and evaluated?
    3. Does your organisation have sectoral specific indicators that include a gender dimension?
    4. Gender disaggregated data provides useful information for programme/project evaluation and subsequent programme/project design?
    5. Does APEM programmes/projects contribute to the empowerment of women and the changing of unequal gender relations.
    6. Does APEM programmes/projects contribute to increase gender equity in the following areas:
    • Material well-being
    • Access to resources
    • Access to training
    • Participation in decision-making
    • Self-respect/legal status
    • Control over benefits
    • Control over resources
    • Participation in the public sector
    • Service receivers view of the project’s benefit to their lives

     

    E.            Partner Organisations

     

    ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 , TO WHAT EXTENT:

     

    1. Is commitment to gender equity a criteria in your organisation’s selection of funding partners , service receivers  or local NGO affiliates?
    2. Is a gender policy included in the written agreements outlining your organisation’s relationship with partner or local NGO affiliates?
    3. Does your organisation provide training and tools on gender planning, analysis and evaluation to partner or local NGO affiliate staff?
    4. What are some of the obstacles to incorporating gender analysis in programme/project planning, implementation and evaluation in your organisation?  Please check all that apply:
    • Unit size
    • Level of staffing
    • Office culture/environment
    • Natural culture
    • Lack of financial resources for gender programming
    • Lack of staff training on gender
    • Lack of gender analysis tools
    • Lack of support from senior management
    • Low organisational priority for gender issues
    • Other (please specify) ………………………………………………. .

     

    II.            Organisational

     

    A.            Gender Policy

     

    1. Does your organisation have a written gender policy that affirms a commitment to gender equity ?
    2. Does your gender policy have an operational plan that includes clear allocation of responsibilities and item for monitoring and evaluation?
    3. Is gender taken into account during strategic planning for organisational activities?
    4.  Everyone in the organisation feels ownership over the gender policy.
    5. Management takes responsibility for the development and implementation of the gender policy.

     

     

    B.            Staffing

     

    1. At headquarters, has there been an increase in the representation of women in senior management positions in the past few years?
    2. In the field, has there been an increase in the representation of women in senior management positions in the past few years?
    3. Has there been an increase in the representation of women on your organisation’s board in the past few years?
    4. Are there proactive strategies implemented to recruit or promote women into senior management positions?
    5. Does management show respect for diversity in work and management styles in your organisation?

     

    C.            Human Resources

     

    1. Is there a written equal opportunity policy?
    2. Are there flexible work arrangements in your organisation?
    3. Is there a maternity and paternity leave policy?
    4. Is there a child care and dependent care leave policy?
    5. Is gender awareness included in all job descriptions?
    6. Is gender awareness included in job performance criteria?
    7. Is there training of staff in gender awareness and sensitisation?
    8. Is there training of senior management and members of Board in institutionalising the integration of gender into the management of the organisation?
    9. My organisation promotes teamwork, involving both men and women.
    10. Management is committed to promoting women representation at senior levels of my organisation, including the Board.
    11. There has been a gradual increase of gender expertise among staff members in my organisation.
    12. Good performance in the field of gender is rewarded in my organisation.

     

    D.            Advocacy, Marketing and Communications

     

    1. Are advocacy campaign and initiatives planned and informed by a gender perspective?
    2. Are your advocacy policies and plan influenced and advised by women’s organisations, networks and gender experts?
    3. Is gender incorporated in your organisation’s communications, fund-raising and media strategies?
    4. Is a gender perspective reflected in your publications, for example, books, brochures, and newsletters?

     

     E.            Financial Resources

     

    1. Has your organisation budgeted adequate financial resources to support its gender integration work?
    2. Are financial resources allocated for the operationalisation of the gender policy at all levels?
    3. Is staff training in gender issues and analysis systematically budgeted for?

     

    F.             Organisational Culture

     

    1. Does the organisation comply with gender sensitive behaviour, for example in terms of language used, jokes and comments made?
    2. Does the organisation comply with gender sensitive behaviour procedures to prevent and address sexual harassment?
    3. Is staff in your organisation committed to the implementation of a gender policy?
    4. Are gender issues taken seriously and discussed openly by men and women in your organisation?
    5. Is gender stereotyping (eg.  “those gender blind men” or “those feminists”) addressed and countered by individual staff members in your organisation?
    6. Is there a gap between how men and women in my organisation view gender issues?
    7. Are the  staff in my organisation  enthusiastic about the gender work they do?
    8. Do the staff in my organisation think that gender fits into the image of our organisation.?
    9. Do the women in my organisation think that the organisation is woman friendly?
    10. Do the Men in my organisation think that the organisation is men friendly?
    11. Does my organisation have a reputation of integrity and competence on gender issues amongst leaders in the field of gender and development?
    12. Could  my organisation do much more than it is currently doing to institutionalise gender equity?
    13. Does the organisational culture in APEM  place a higher value on the ways men tend to work  and less value on the ways women tend to work?
    14. Are meetings in my organisation tend to be dominated by men staff.?
    15. Has the  working environment in my organisation  improved for women over the past two years.?
    16. Is it  unfair to promote women more than men in my organisation’s field programmes/projects?
    17. In my organisation, do men have a much easier time establishing personal and professional networks within the APEM than do women.
    18. Do you think APEM is strong to take action on gender integration?



    APEM SL LTD MEMBER CBO CAPACITY ASSESSMENT

    A

     

    BASELINE SCORES

    GOVERNANCE , STRATEGY AND STRUCTURE OF THE APEM .

    FIRST AUDIT (August 2020)

     

     

     

    ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, TO WHAT EXTENT:

     

     

    1.1

     

    Has APEM got an independent Board of Directors and is governed by a documented constitution.?

     

     

    1.2

     

     Is APEM legally recognised according to local regulations?

     

     

    1.3

     

    Is the Board diverse , gender  representative and provides technical expertise?

     

     

    1.4

     

    Is the Board of Directors effective and committed in their roles and responsibilities?

     

     

    1.5

     

    Has APEM got a documented  and  up-to-date  strategic plan that is understood by all staff and used in planning?

     

     

    1.6

     

     Is the APEM  organisational structure effective for delegating responsibilities, timely planning and sharing information between staff?

     






    B.

     

     

    HUMAN RESOURCES AND ADMINISTRATION

     

     

     

     

    ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, TO WHAT EXTENT:

     

     

    2.1

     

     Are administrative responsibilities well understood, documented  and followed ?

     

     

    2.2

     

     Has APEM got  policies and procedures for staff capacity development well developed and documented?

     

     

    2.3

     

    Does all staff have job descriptions that are documented and regularly reviewed and are relevant to their actual jobs ?

     

     

    2.4

     

     Is there a documented framework for appraising staff performance?

     

     

    2.5

     

     Has APEM got  a well documented HIV/AIDS work place policy in place?

     

     

    2.6

     

    Is training and development programmes based on documented gender sensitive need assessment?

     






    C

     

    BASELINE SCORES

      PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT , MONITORING , EVALUATION AND REPORTING

    FIRST AUDIT (August 2006)

     

     

     

    ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 , TO WHAT EXTENT:

     

     

    3.1

     

     Is project management well understood and followed at  every  stage of the project cycle in consultation with all stakeholders ?

     

     

    3.2

     

     Are programmes in line with the strategic goals ?

     

     

    3.3

     

     Are progress indicators developed at the design stage of every project?

     

     

    3.4

     

     Are progress indicators regularly monitored after baseline studies ?

     

     

    3.5

     

    Do all projects have work plans and budgets that are reviewed regularly?

     

     

    3.6

     

    Has APEM got a fully documented monitoring and evaluation system?

     

     

    3.7

     

    Are periodic monitoring  and end of project evaluation reports  shared with all stakeholders and donors on time?

     

     

    3.8

     

    Is work organised and information shared through regular staff meetings?

     

     

     

     

     

     

    D

     

     

    FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY?

     

     

     

     

    ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 , TO WHAT EXTENT:

     

     

    4.1

     

    Are there financial policies put in place to control use of money , prevent fraud and improve accountability?

     

     

    4.2

     

    Are financial procedures  well documented?

     

     

    4.3

     

    Are project coordinators responsible for  controlling the sanctioned budgets of their projects?

     

     

    4.4

     

     Is an audit conducted after  18 months  of implementing every project?

     

     

    4.5

     

     Is an annual budget prepared for APEM as a whole?.

     

     

    4.6

     

    Has APEM run out of cash  to meet programmes and core costs over the past 2 years.

     

     

    4.7

     

    Is APEM financially sustainable with a diverse funding base?

     

     

     

     

     

     

    E

     

    BASELINE SCORES

    AWARENESS OF EXTERNAL WORKING ENVIRONMENT

    FIRST AUDIT (August 2006)

     

     

     

    ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 , TO WHAT EXTENT:

     

     

    5.1

     

    Can staff describe the work and objectives of local , regional and national organisations doing APEM-like programmes?

     

     

    5.2

     

     Has APEM staff made experience sharing personal contacts on staff of other organisations doing similar activities?

     

     

    5.3

     

    Has APEM staff  participated in regular local, provincial and national experience sharing forums ?

     

     

    5.4

     

     Has APEM staff  participated in experience sharing visits with other organisations  within the past two years?

     

     

    5.5

     

    Has APEM collaborated on joint projects with at least two other organisations within the past 2 years?

     

     

    5.6

     

     Has APEM received  financial or material support for programmes and core cost  from local or external agencies?

     

     

     

     

     

     

    F

     

     

    TECHNICAL CAPACITY OF KEY AND FRONTLINE STAFF

     

     

     

     

                 ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 , TO WHAT EXTENT:

     

     

    6.1

     

     Does each key and frontline staff have the required knowledge, experience and skills in the specific  area APEM operates in?

     

     

    6.2

     

     Do all staff up-date their knowledge and skills ?

     

     

    6.3

     

     Does APEM have specialist staff for the work the organisations performs?

     

     

    6.4

     

    Have the frontline staff  received relevant training in the work they do ?

     

     

    6.5

     

    Have the key and frontline staffs received a sound basic educational background?

     

     

     

     

     

     

    G

     

    BASELINE SCORES

    STAFFING

    FIRST AUDIT (August 2006)




                 ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 , TO WHAT EXTENT:


     

    7.1

     

    At headquarters, has there been an increase in the representation of women in senior management positions in the past few years?

     

     

    7.2

     

    In the field, has there been an increase in the representation of women in senior management positions in the past few years?

     

     

    7.3

     

    Has there been an increase in the representation of women on your organisation’s Board in the past few years?

     

     

    7.4

     

    Are there proactive strategies implemented to recruit or promote women into senior management positions?

     

     

    7.5

     

    Does management show respect for gender diversity in work and management styles in your organisation?

     

     

     

     

     

     

    H

     

     

    ADVOCACY, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION

     

     

     

     

                 ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 , TO WHAT EXTENT:

     

     

    8.1

     

     Are advocacy campaigns and initiatives planned and informed by a gender perspective?

     

     

    8.2

     

    Are your advocacy policies and plans influenced and advised by women’s organisations, networks and gender experts?

     

     

    8.3

     

    Is gender incorporated in your organisation’s communications, fund-raising and media strategies?

     

     

    8.4

     

     Is a gender perspective reflected in resources materials read or published at the APEM; for example, books, brochures, and newsletters?

     

     

     

     

     

     

    I

     

    BASELINE SCORES

    FINANCIAL RESOURCES

    FIRST AUDIT (August 2006)

     

     

     

                 ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 , TO WHAT EXTENT:

     

     

    9.1

     

    Has your organisation budgeted adequate financial resources to support its gender integration work?

     

     

    9.2

     

    Are financial resources allocated for the operationalisation of the gender policy at all levels?

     

     

    9.3

     

     Is staff training in gender issues and analysis systematically budgeted for?

     

     

     

     

     

     

    J

     

     

    ORGANISATIONAL CULTURE

     

     

     

     

                 ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 , TO WHAT EXTENT:

     

     

    10.1

     

    Does the organisation comply with gender sensitive behaviour, for example in terms of language used, jokes and comments made?

     

     

    10.2

     

     Does the organisation comply with gender sensitive behaviour and procedures to prevent and address sexual harassment?

     

     

    10.3

     

     Is staff in your organisation committed to the implementation of a gender policy?

     

     

    10.4

     

     Are gender issues taken seriously and discussed openly by men and women in your organisation?

     

     

    10.5

     

     Are the  staff in APEM  enthusiastic about the gender work they do?

     

     

    10.6

     

     Do the staff in APEM think that gender fits into the image of our organisation.?

     

     

    10.7

     

     Do the women in APEM think that the organisation is woman friendly?

     

     

    10.8

     

     Do the Men in APEM think that the organisation is men friendly?

     

     

    10.9

     

     Does APEM have a reputation of integrity and competence on gender issues amongst leaders in the field of gender and development?